Supporting the COVID-19 Vaccination Effort

We are #StrongerTogether

Vaccines work!

“We’re all in this together and want to share clear medically based facts so people can make informed decisions. If sharing these resources helps even one person to better understand COVID-19 vaccinations, we are one step closer to ending this pandemic.”

Frank Sabella

VP Research, Development, Quality and Global Special Situations Management Team Lead

Stronger Together emblem
play button

Monday, April 05, 2021

Our company values are rooted in doing what’s right and as we continue to navigate through the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re committed to helping our colleagues as well as our communities understand the COVID-19 vaccination information available. The experts are clear – vaccines work! Safe and effective vaccines are what will end this pandemic and ensure a healthier and safer future for us all.

We are determined to do our part to help end this pandemic as quickly as possible and have taken several important steps as vaccines begin to roll out:

  • Our teams around the world have been working hard over the past months to ensure our frontline employees get priority access to vaccines as soon as possible.
  • We have also committed to covering the cost of the vaccine for all colleagues if not already paid for by their government or healthcare plan.
  • Additionally, we are providing flexibility to allow time for colleagues to get the vaccine and have conducted several vaccine clinics for our manufacturing facilities and will explore more for our facilities where possible.

We’ve also been working with Dr. Barbara Pahud, an infectious disease specialist and former Stanford University Vaccine Fellow, to provide advice and guidance to our colleagues on COVID-19 vaccine information. Her input has been incredibly valuable in understanding the constantly changing vaccine space, and we wanted to take the opportunity to share this resource outside of our organization. 

“We’re all in this together and want to share clear medically based facts so people can make informed decisions. If sharing these resources helps even one person to better understand COVID-19 vaccinations, we are one step closer to ending this pandemic,” says Frank Sabella, VP Research, Development, Quality and Global Special Situations Management Team Lead.

Below (and in the video above) we’ve rounded up the most frequently-asked vaccine questions along with responses from Dr. Barbara. 

COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ & Responses from Dr. Barbara

What is the difference between COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2?
COVID-19 is the name of the disease caused by the virus called SARS-COV-2, which stands for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. 

Can you get COVID-19 from the vaccine?
No. Vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 use inactivated virus, parts of the virus, or a gene from the virus. None of these can cause COVID-19. 

Will the vaccine hurt? 
No. The injection into your arm won’t feel any different than any other vaccine. You might feel mild discomfort, as you would with any vaccine. 

Should I get the vaccine if I have allergies?
Consult your doctor. If you have allergies, especially severe ones that require you to carry an EpiPen, discuss the COVID-19 vaccine with your doctor.

Can children get the vaccine?
No. So far, no COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for children. 

Can I choose which vaccine I get? 
Likely not. My recommendation: take what you are offered! 

Are there possible side effects?
Yes. There is a potential for short-term side effects including fatigue, headache, chills and muscle pain.

If I get the vaccine, can I still get COVID-19 and transmit to others?
Unclear.  The vaccine will prevent you from getting sick, but it’s possible you can still carry and pass the virus to others. 

Will we still need to wear masks and practice social distancing after receiving the vaccine?
Yes. We will need to continue to wear PPE and practice social distancing until a large portion of the population is vaccinated.

These vaccines were developed very quickly – are they safe?
Yes. Approved vaccines have gone through careful testing and clinical trials, received authorization for emergency use, and are continuously monitored for side effects.

Do I have to start over if I forget to take the second dose of the vaccine on time?
No. For two-dose vaccines, the second dose can be received any time after the first (following the mandatory waiting period), but you should try to take it at the recommended interval. 

My healthcare provider / government is recommending we take only one dose for now to increase the number of people who get it. Is that right?
Yes. This is a way to increase the number of people who are exposed to the vaccine as quickly as possible. It will be possible to take a second vaccine at a later stage. 

How long will the vaccine last?
Unclear. Coronavirus vaccines may become an annual event (like the flu shot), or the benefits may last longer than a year, but we need to do further testing. 

We also recently hosted an informational session with Dr. Barbara to talk more about the various vaccines available, why we’re seeing different efficacy rates, and what those mean. You can watch that video here. Her main takeaway: vaccines work and you should take any vaccine you can get, as soon as you can get it!

Fore more resources about COVID-19 vaccinations, please visit:

We are #StrongerTogether! We hope you find these resources helpful, and will continue to share additional information from Dr. Barbara as it’s available.

Dr. Pahud

Dr. Barbara Pahud is an infectious disease specialist and former Stanford University Vaccine Fellow. She is currently a member of the United States COVID-19 Prevention Network (CoVPN), formed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the US National Institutes of Health to respond to the global pandemic. As a part of this network, Dr. Pahud is helping conduct Phase 3 efficacy trials for COVID-19 vaccines in adults and children. She is a frequent commentator on US media networks and in media publications, particularly on the topic of COVID-19.